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Posts Tagged ‘New I-9 Form’

New I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Form, Effective Sept. 18, 2017

Monday, July 17th, 2017

I-9+Website+High+res+Logo_x625[1]USCIS released a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, on July 17. Instructions for how to download Form I-9 are available on the Form I-9 page. On Sept. 18th, employers must use the revised form with a revision date of 07/17/17N. Employers must continue following existing storage and retention rules for any previously completed Form I-9s.

Revisions to the Form I-9 instructions:

  • USCIS changed the name of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices to its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.
  • They removed “the end of” from the phrase “the first day of employment.”

Revisions related to the List of Acceptable Documents on Form I-9:

  • Added the Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240) to List C. Employers completing Form I-9 on a computer will be able to select Form FS-240 from the drop-down menus available in List C of Sections 2 and 3. E-Verify users will also be able to select Form FS-240 when creating a case for an employee who has presented this document for Form I-9.
  • Combined all the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350, and Form FS-240) into selection C #2 in List C.
  • Renumbered all List C documents except the Social Security card. For example, the employment authorization document issued by the Department of Homeland Security on List C changed from List C #8 to List C #7.

USCIS included these changes in the revised Handbook for Employers: Guidance for Completing Form I-9 (M-274), which is also easier for users to navigate.

Should you have any questions or would like to discuss how your company can establish a culture of compliance, please contact us at info@immigrationcompliancegroup.com

BREAKING NEWS —————-NEW I-9 FORM RELEASED 11/14/2016

Monday, November 14th, 2016

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On Nov. 14, 2016 USCIS released a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification.  Employers may continue using Form I-9 with a revision date of 03/08/2013N  through Jan. 21, 2017.  By Jan. 22, 2017, employers must use the revised form.

Employers should continue to follow existing storage and retention rules for all of their previously completed Forms I-9. Refer here for more information.

Remember to login to our webinar on Wednesday Nov. 16th, 3pm EST/12pm PST for training on the new I-9 form:  http://www.immigrationcompliancegroup.com/webinars2016/ and save the date for the E-Verify webinar as well on December 15, 2016.

 

 

Employers Must Use Revised Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification Form

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

  USCIS Will not Accept Previous Versions of Form I-9 as of May 7, 2013

USCIS reminds employers that beginning today, May 7, 2013,  they must use the revised Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (Revision 03/08/13)N for all new hires and reverifications. All employers are required to complete and retain a Form I-9 for each employee hired to work in the United States.

The revision date of the new Form I-9 is printed on the lower left corner of the form. Employers should not complete a new Form I-9 for existing employees, however, if a properly completed Form I-9 is already on file.

A Spanish version of Form I-9 (revision 03/08/13)N is available on the USCIS website for use in Puerto Rico only. Spanish-speaking employers and employees in the 50 states, Washington, D.C., and other U.S. territories may use the Spanish version for reference, but must complete and retain the English version of the form.

The revised forms are available online at www.uscis.gov/I-9. USCIS has also offering free webinars to help employers learn about the new form.  To order forms, call USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676. For free downloadable forms and information on USCIS programs, immigration laws, regulations, and procedures, please visit www.uscis.gov and go to the ‘forms’ menu or I-9 Central

New I-9 Form Update from Immigration Compliance Group

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

A new edition of the I-9 employment eligibility verification form was introduced last week.  USCIS has been working on the revised I-9 form for more than a year.  The revised M-274 Handbook for Employers can be accessed at the same link.  Many areas on the I-9 Central website have also been updated.  Note the webinar schedule for the new form.

The new edition of the I-9 Form, dated March 8, 2013, will take effect immediately on publication and will become the only acceptable version of the form.  Employers who need to make necessary updates to their business processes to allow for use of the new Form I-9 may continue to use other previously accepted revisions (Rev.02/02/09)N and (Rev. 08/07/09)Y until May 6, 2013.  Effective May 7, 2013, all employers must use the revised Form I-9 for each new employee hired in the United States.  Employers who are not using the I-9 form following the 60-day grace period will be subject to fines and penalties under 274(a) of The Act (The Immigration and Nationality Act),  IRCA, as well as ICE.

The revised Form I-9 has several new features, including new fields and a new format to reduce errors, and more clearly describes the information employees and employers must provide in each section. The instructions to the form are now 7 pages in length, and we recommend that you provide the instructions and the list of documents to your new employees to refer to during the process.  The form looks much more official and now displays the DHS seal at the top left of the form with space built in to eventually implement future barcode technology.  Helpful new images have been added to the M-274 Handbook to illustrate how employees and employers can complete Sections 1-3 of the new form. Please also see page 23 for updated guidance on recording changes of name and other identity guidance.

In the USCIS Stakeholder conference held on March 11, 2013, many of the questions centered around the following topics that we thought might be helpful to share with you, as follows:

  1. Do I need to fill out a new I-9 forms for all employees?  You do not need to do new I-9 forms for those employees who already have one.
  2. When to accept receipts:  Receipts for initial employment or renewal (during reverification) of employment are not acceptable.  There are 3 different documents that qualify as receipts are:  (a) Receipts may be presented for sections 2 and 3 if the document was lost, stolen or damaged; the receipt is valid for 90 days.  (b) Temporary I-551 (a printable notation on a machine-readable immigrant visa inside a foreign passport).  This is a 1-year permanent residency stamp for a foreign national that has received permanent status abroad.  The Form I-551 (permanent residency card) must be presented prior to or no later than the expiration stamp inside the passport.  (c) An I-94 entry card with an unexpired refugee stamp.  This is considered a receipt for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD card), or a combination of an unrestricted Social Security Card and a List B document and is valid for 90 days.
  3. Rehires and Reverifications:  If you are rehiring an employee who completed an I-9 form within 3 years, you can continue to use the existing I-9 form, and record any name changes, the rehire date and other required information in Section 3 and change the date of hire in Section 2 (initial/date).  If their work authorization as changed you can make the correction on the existing form if still valid or generate a new form I-9 and fill in Section 3 and attach to the old form.  As a reminder, do not reverify US citizens, permanent residents, conditional residents, asylees with unrestricted work authorization and List B identity documents such as driver’s licenses and state ID cards.
  4. The use of notaries:  Notaries are “designated agents” of the employer.  They should not imprint their notary stamp on any I-9 documentation or attach same to the I-9 form.  The employer is responsible for their actions and any violations relating to Form I-9.  Photocopies of I-9 forms are also not acceptable from Notaries.  A notary or any other designated agent appointed by the employer must examine the original documents presented to them and thoroughly complete and sign section 2 of the form and return the original to the employer, along with photocopies of the presented documents should this be a company policy.
  5. Recording social security numbers:  On the List of Acceptable Documents for List C, Social Security card restrictions are explained to better assist in examination of the document.  Note that individuals with temporary work authorization are issued restricted social security cards that indicate:  “Not valid without USCIS/DHS work authorization
  6. Recording the date of hire in Section 2:  When an offer of employment is extended and accepted but the employee has not yet started, the I-9 may be completed using that date instead of the ‘actual’ start date of employment.  You may then go back into the form and adjust the date to the actual start date (the 1st day of work for pay).  Recruiters or recruiters for a fee are not required to enter the employee’s first day of employment.  However, you may enter the first day the employee was placed in a job pool after an offer of employment and acceptance.
  7. Must employee present documents that correspond to box checked in Section 1?  No, employers may not insist on viewing any particular documents. However, if information is recorded in section 1 that puts the employer “on notice” that work authorization may be expiring, you are required to track that date and follow-up with the employee concerning their continued work authorization.

USCIS has indicated that a good place to begin implementing the use of the new I-9 form is to take time to first thoroughly read and digest the revised M-274 Handbook for Employers.  Download it from the USCIS website and provide a complete copy to each and every employee charged with processing and managing the I-9 function at your place of employment to ensure that they are aware of the changes and are equipped to properly implement them.  Update your company policies to reflect the changes in the form.

For those of you who manage your I-9 forms via an electronic software vendor, this is absolutely the right time to have a conversation with them concerning their compliance with the new form and make sure that it complies with all pertinent rules and regulations for I-9 electronic software .  This is also an excellent time to think about additional training for your staff.  Refer here for our services and solutions.

To order copies of the new I-9 form from USCIS, you can call 1-800-870-3676.

NewsFLASH —— New I-9 Form Released March 8, 2013

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

A new edition of the I-9 employment eligibility verification form has been introduced today and has been published in the Federal Register as of this writing.  USCIS has been working on the revised I-9 form for more than a year. In March 2012, it published  a proposed revision for public comment.

The new edition, dated March 8, 2013, will take effect immediately on publication and will become the only acceptable version of the form.  Employers who need to make necessary updates to their business processes to allow for use of the new Form I-9 may continue to use other previously accepted revisions (Rev.02/02/09)N and (Rev. 08/07/09)Y until May 7, 2013.  After May 7, 2013, all employers must use the revised Form I-9 for each new employee hired in the United States.  Employers who are not using the I-9 form following the 60-day grace period will be subject to fines and penalties under 274(a) of The Act (The Immigration and Nationality Act),  IRCA, as well as ICE.

The revised Form I-9 has several new features, including new fields and a new format to reduce errors. The instructions to the form also more clearly describe the information employees and employers must provide in each section.  To order copies of the new I-9 form from USCIS, you can call  1-800-870-3676.

For those of you who manage your I-9 forms via an electronic software vendor, this is absolutely the right time to have a conversation with them concerning their compliance with the new form.  This is also a good time to think about additional training for your staff.  Refer here for our services and solutions.  We will be reviewing the form very carefully in the next few days and will post our comments and guidance.

I-9/E-Verify News: What to Expect from the Newly Proposed I-9 Form

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

We expect the newly revised, 2-page I-9 form will be released in the first quarter of 2013.

Some Background …On March 27, 2012 USCIS released an initial draft of the I-9 form for public comment.  The new version is very different than the current I-9 form in use, with several new fields, a new layout and a form that is double the size.

USCIS received an amazing 6,200 comments and suggestions on the initial draft and then published an updated version of the form with instructions that includes several changes to the first draft published in May (see below). You can find more information about the newly proposed revisions to the Form I-9 here.   Please note that this proposed form is not in use; we are still using the form with the revision date of August 7, 2009 until further notice.

To help ensure compliance with the new changes, employers need to be ready to supply the necessary information, prepared to update training materials, and to partner with third-party I-9 experts.  With the right preparation and education, employers can be confident that they are meeting requirements and avoiding the hefty fines that come with mistakes as they develop the workforce that will help them meet company hiring requirements and goals, while maintaining a compliant workforce.

If you haven’t taken the time to do some comparing between the proposed I-9 form and the current one, here are some highlights that may assist you in ramping up for the upcoming changes.  Overall, we note:

  • Improvement in heading lines for the document fields clarify where List B and C information should be placed on the form.
  • Perjury language has been repositioned and enumerated for clarification and readability to avoid any confusion.
  • New language helps employers understand what documents are acceptable for non-immigrant aliens, and the instances in which a Social Security Card does not grant an individual permission for work.
  • The new form asks for “the employee’s first day of work for pay.” Although this has always been  the implied definition of “start date”, it is now described as such in the proposed new version.

Section 1

1. Last and First Name Fields: The form now shows “Last Name (Family Name)” and “First Name (Given Name)”, rather than the reverse.

2. Maiden Name is now called “Other Names Used (if any)”. Instructions state:  “Provide all other names used, if any (including your maiden name).  Write N/A if you’ve not had other legal names.”

3. Address – Must be a US address, except for border commuters from Canada and Mexico.

4. The Social Security Number boxes are now formatted to fit the requisite 9 digits.  Instructions now indicate that SS number are required for employers enrolled in E-Verify.

5. Email Address and Telephone Number – New fields.  Optional, per the instructions, but not marked as such on the form.  Note:  Though these fields are optional, many feel that the DHS should not have this information, as it could be used to contact individuals directly to probe for potential employer violations.

6. A-Number vs. USCIS Number: The instructions note that the “USCIS number is the same as the A-number without the “A” prefix. Another clarification: Foreigners authorized to work can provide either the A-Number/USCIS Number OR the Form I-94 number.

7. Form I-94 Admission Number: find the admission number on Form I-94 or “as directed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in connection with your arrival in the United States.”  – leaving room for future CBP changes.   Note: The CBP has started the process of creating a new identification number for non-citizens to be used throughout the immigration process.

8. Barcode: – A space for a 3-D Barcode has been added to page 1 and 2, along with a “Do not write in this space” notation.   We are unsure at this time concerning the purpose of the barcode.

9. Stop Sign Icons:  The form now has two “Stop Sign” icons at the bottom of page 1, instead of “Go to Next page.”  This is to clearly prevent employees from accidentally completing section 2.

Section 2

10. Includes words concerning an “Authorized Representative,” that a designated agent or notary can act in an agent capacity in completing Section 2.

11. Moved the employee name fields (Last, First, and Middle initial) underneath the Section 2 heading and added the words “from Section 1” indicating that it is acceptable for the employer to enter this data.

12 Added new fields for the document title and issuing authority of second and third list A documents which more frequently pertain to foreign employees with certain document types.

Section 3 and List of Acceptable Documents

Minor changes, mostly related to formatting and clarification of the “Social Security Account Number card” restrictions.

Should you wish to consult with us on compliance matters, please refer to our compliance services and solutions here  or contact our office at info@immigraticompliancegroup .com or call 562 612.3996.

 

Update: CBP Makes Changes Affecting I-9 Form, F, M and J Visa Stamping

Friday, September 7th, 2012

The Department of Homeland Security issued an update today that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is working to resolve this issue and will have a fix on September 14, 2012.

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Without any advance notice, the CBP has made changes that affect the I-9 form by no longer issuing paper I-94 cards and no longer stamping I-20 forms for F and M student visas, or form DS-2019 Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitors and Foreign Students, affecting both J and F visa holders.

Customs and Border Protection is in the process of automating traveler arrival records (I-94 cards) to streamline passenger processing. The current processing time for entering foreign visitors’ travel information into the I-94 database is 30 days or more. This does not affect the majority of foreign travelers visiting for business or leisure and will not affect any visitor’s record of departure.  But it will greatly influence how you document Section 2 of the I-9 form for the nonimmigrant employee that produces a List A foreign passport with an I-94 entry card.

PLEASE NOTE: With the newly proposed 2-page I-9 form, no guidance has as yet been provided regarding the I-94 card as an acceptable List A document in concert with a foreign passport. We will keep you posted concerning these changes as soon as we receive new guidance. In the meantime, we recommend that you print out this information and attach it to any new employee’s I-9 form who would normally produce an I-94 record (but doesn’t have one and is waiting to access an electronic version) along with a foreign passport as a List A document.

CBP has suggested the following:  Nomiggrants may need to prove their legal-visitor status within the first 30-45 days of their U.S. stay to:

Employers;
Motor vehicle registration or drivers’ licensing agencies;
The Social Security Administration;
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services; or
Universities and schools.

If during this timeframe, visitors need to provide evidence of legal status they should include the following:

Unexpired foreign passport; and
Country of Citizenship
CBP Arrival/Departure Record, Form I-94 (if issued)

Contact CBP for more information or with questions.

Tel: (877) CBP-5511
TTD: (866) 880-6582

If a state benefit granting agency rejects an unstamped Form I-20/DS-2019, applicants may make an appointment with USCIS online through InfoPass and take their Form I-20/DS-2019 to their local USCIS office to be stamped. ( InfoPass ) This transitional step will end on Nov. 21, 2012.

International students and scholars who encounter issues with their state or federal benefit applications should continue to contact the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) at (703) 603-3400 or SEVP@dhs.gov.

Please feel free to contact our office should you have questions concerning these changes, 562 612.3996 or email info@immigrationcompliancegroup.com